Home > News > Tibet > Human & Nature >

View of wild animals in Tibet, SW China
By:Xinhua
update:April 18,2022
  

Photo taken on April 9, 2022 shows a herd of Tibetan antelopes in Rutog County, southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region. Tibet has become an ideal habitat for wild animals over the years amid the region's thriving biodiversity protection endeavors.
 
Compared to statistics released by the regional wildlife conservation society in the 1990s, the population of Tibetan wild ass has risen to around 90,000 from 50,000 previously.
 
The population of black-necked cranes has exceeded 10,000 from 1,000 to 3,000 previously, while the number of wild yaks rose to about 10,000.
 
Meanwhile, the population of Tibetan antelopes has surged from 50,000 to more than 300,000 over the past decades. (Xinhua/Jiang Fan)
 
 
Photo taken on April 9, 2022 shows a herd of Tibetan antelopes in Rutog County, southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region. Tibet has become an ideal habitat for wild animals over the years amid the region's thriving biodiversity protection endeavors.
 
Compared to statistics released by the regional wildlife conservation society in the 1990s, the population of Tibetan wild ass has risen to around 90,000 from 50,000 previously.
 
The population of black-necked cranes has exceeded 10,000 from 1,000 to 3,000 previously, while the number of wild yaks rose to about 10,000.
 
Meanwhile, the population of Tibetan antelopes has surged from 50,000 to more than 300,000 over the past decades. (Xinhua/Jiang Fan)
 
 
Photo taken with a mobile phone shows a Tibetan antelope walking across a road in Rutog County, southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, April 9, 2022. Tibet has become an ideal habitat for wild animals over the years amid the region's thriving biodiversity protection endeavors.
 
Compared to statistics released by the regional wildlife conservation society in the 1990s, the population of Tibetan wild ass has risen to around 90,000 from 50,000 previously.
 
The population of black-necked cranes has exceeded 10,000 from 1,000 to 3,000 previously, while the number of wild yaks rose to about 10,000.
 
Meanwhile, the population of Tibetan antelopes has surged from 50,000 to more than 300,000 over the past decades. (Xinhua/Shen Hongbing)
 
 
Photo taken on April 8, 2022 shows a herd of Tibetan wild donkeys in Rutog County, southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region. Tibet has become an ideal habitat for wild animals over the years amid the region's thriving biodiversity protection endeavors.
 
Compared to statistics released by the regional wildlife conservation society in the 1990s, the population of Tibetan wild ass has risen to around 90,000 from 50,000 previously.
 
The population of black-necked cranes has exceeded 10,000 from 1,000 to 3,000 previously, while the number of wild yaks rose to about 10,000.
 
Meanwhile, the population of Tibetan antelopes has surged from 50,000 to more than 300,000 over the past decades. (Xinhua/Jiang Fan)
 
 
Photo taken on April 12, 2022 shows a herd of a Tibetan antelopes in Gerze County, southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region. Tibet has become an ideal habitat for wild animals over the years amid the region's thriving biodiversity protection endeavors.
 
Compared to statistics released by the regional wildlife conservation society in the 1990s, the population of Tibetan wild ass has risen to around 90,000 from 50,000 previously.
 
The population of black-necked cranes has exceeded 10,000 from 1,000 to 3,000 previously, while the number of wild yaks rose to about 10,000.
 
Meanwhile, the population of Tibetan antelopes has surged from 50,000 to more than 300,000 over the past decades. (Xinhua/Jiang Fan)
 
 
Photo taken on April 12, 2022 shows a herd of Tibetan wild donkeys in Ge'gyai County, southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region. Tibet has become an ideal habitat for wild animals over the years amid the region's thriving biodiversity protection endeavors.
 
Compared to statistics released by the regional wildlife conservation society in the 1990s, the population of Tibetan wild ass has risen to around 90,000 from 50,000 previously.
 
The population of black-necked cranes has exceeded 10,000 from 1,000 to 3,000 previously, while the number of wild yaks rose to about 10,000.
 
Meanwhile, the population of Tibetan antelopes has surged from 50,000 to more than 300,000 over the past decades. (Xinhua/Jiang Fan)
 
 
Photo taken on April 12, 2022 shows a herd of Tibetan gazelles in Gerze County, southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region. Tibet has become an ideal habitat for wild animals over the years amid the region's thriving biodiversity protection endeavors.
 
Compared to statistics released by the regional wildlife conservation society in the 1990s, the population of Tibetan wild ass has risen to around 90,000 from 50,000 previously.
 
The population of black-necked cranes has exceeded 10,000 from 1,000 to 3,000 previously, while the number of wild yaks rose to about 10,000.
 
Meanwhile, the population of Tibetan antelopes has surged from 50,000 to more than 300,000 over the past decades. (Xinhua/Jiang Fan)
 
 
Photo taken on April 10, 2022 shows a flock of bar-headed geese in Rutog County, southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region. Tibet has become an ideal habitat for wild animals over the years amid the region's thriving biodiversity protection endeavors.
 
Compared to statistics released by the regional wildlife conservation society in the 1990s, the population of Tibetan wild ass has risen to around 90,000 from 50,000 previously.
 
The population of black-necked cranes has exceeded 10,000 from 1,000 to 3,000 previously, while the number of wild yaks rose to about 10,000.
 
Meanwhile, the population of Tibetan antelopes has surged from 50,000 to more than 300,000 over the past decades. (Xinhua/Jiang Fan)
 
 
Photo taken on April 9, 2022 shows black-necked cranes in Rutog County, southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region. Tibet has become an ideal habitat for wild animals over the years amid the region's thriving biodiversity protection endeavors.
 
Compared to statistics released by the regional wildlife conservation society in the 1990s, the population of Tibetan wild ass has risen to around 90,000 from 50,000 previously.
 
The population of black-necked cranes has exceeded 10,000 from 1,000 to 3,000 previously, while the number of wild yaks rose to about 10,000.
 
Meanwhile, the population of Tibetan antelopes has surged from 50,000 to more than 300,000 over the past decades. (Xinhua/Jiang Fan)
 
 
Photo taken on April 13, 2022 shows a bearded vulture in Baingoin County, southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region. Tibet has become an ideal habitat for wild animals over the years amid the region's thriving biodiversity protection endeavors.
 
Compared to statistics released by the regional wildlife conservation society in the 1990s, the population of Tibetan wild ass has risen to around 90,000 from 50,000 previously.
 
The population of black-necked cranes has exceeded 10,000 from 1,000 to 3,000 previously, while the number of wild yaks rose to about 10,000.
 
Meanwhile, the population of Tibetan antelopes has surged from 50,000 to more than 300,000 over the past decades. (Xinhua/Lodro Gyatso)
 
 
Photo taken with a mobile phone shows a herd of Tibetan wild donkeys in Burang County, southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, April 7, 2022. Tibet has become an ideal habitat for wild animals over the years amid the region's thriving biodiversity protection endeavors.
 
Compared to statistics released by the regional wildlife conservation society in the 1990s, the population of Tibetan wild ass has risen to around 90,000 from 50,000 previously.
 
The population of black-necked cranes has exceeded 10,000 from 1,000 to 3,000 previously, while the number of wild yaks rose to about 10,000.
 
Meanwhile, the population of Tibetan antelopes has surged from 50,000 to more than 300,000 over the past decades. (Xinhua/Shen Hongbing)
  • View of wild animals in Tibet, SW China
  • A glance of Lhoba culture in Mainling County, SW China's Tibet
  • View of Nianbaoyuze national geology park in NW China

E-mail:editor@tibetol.cn |About Us|Contact Us |Site Maps|
Address:3/F, C Tower, RECREO International Centre, 8 Wangjing East Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100102, PRC
Copyright by China Intercontinental Communication Co., Ltd All Rights Reserved.